Gallery

Pair 18th Century British Colonial Planters Chairs from Jamaica, West Indies

An extremely rare matched Pair of 18th Century British Colonial Planters Chairs from the Island of Jamaica in the West Indies. This style of Chair was first made in the City of Campeche in the Yucatan Province of Mexico in the 16th Century during the Spanish Colonial era and were originally known as Campeche Chairs. They became very popular with the Spanish Creole Aristocracy in Mexico and were often found amongst the Mexican Colonial antique furniture on the old Haciendas, where they were also knows as Butaca Chairs. In the 18th Century Spanish Colonists introduced the Campeche Chair also known as the Butaca Chair to Louisiana where they became extremely popular amongst the French Creole Aristocracy who called them Boutac Chairs and introduced them into their Plantation Houses in the Bayous and along the Mississippi River. The Leather-Seated Chars, made from Ox-Hide or Mule-Hide stretched on a Mahogany wood frame, was found ideal for lounging in a Tropical Climate and unlike upholstered furniture it was free from insects. These Campeche Chairs in Louisiana were discovered by the Americans during the Late 18th Century and President Thomas Jefferson even ordered a pair for his Plantation at Monticello in Virginia. This style of Chair was also introduced to Jamaica from Mexico during the 18th Century, probably via Cuba, and until very recently they were known in Jamaica as Spanish Chairs. It was only during the 1970s that people first began calling them Planters Chairs, because they had always been popular with British Planters on the Plantations in Jamaica. Once only found in the old Plantation Great Houses in Jamaica, today they are extremely rare and very sought after by both Dealers and Collectors. Both of the Planters Chairs shown here have an important Provenance and belonged to important families of the Jamaican Plantocracy. The one on the left belonged to the Goffe family and came from Oxford Estate in St. Mary and the one on the right belonged to the Pengelley family and came from Clifton Hill Estate in St. Thomas-in-the-East. This is a unique opportunity to purchase a matched pair of these rare and valuable 18th Century West Indian Planters Chairs.

Length: 35 inches
Width: 30 inches
Height: 42 inches

*SOLD

Price: $7,000.00

Early 19th C. British Colonial Sideboard from Jamaica, West Indies, c 1820

A Magnificent and Massive Early 19th Century British Colonial Plantation Sideboard from the Island of Jamaica in the West Indies. It dates from the George IV Period and was made of solid Mahogany that was Hand-Carved by Slaves on the Plantation, c.1820. The Top of the Sideboard was made from one huge single slab of Mahogany and is 6 foot long, over two foot wide and more than two inches thick. The Front of the Sideboard bears the typical Central Square flanked by boldly carved Horizontal lines. It rests on four boldly carved and turned legs with the multiple rings and barley-twist or twisted-rope design that is characteristic of Early 19th Century Jamaican Colonial and West Indian Colonial Plantation Furniture. In fact the hand-carved designs on the legs are exactly the same found on the posts of Early 19th Century Jamaican Four-Poster Plantation Beds of the same period. This item is one of several splendid pieces of Early 19th Century Jamaican Colonial Furniture being sold and is from the famous Ashmeade-Hawkins Collection. This Magnificent and Massive Early 19th Century Jamaican Colonial Plantation Sideboard originally came from the 18th Century Great House of an old Sugar Plantation near Montego Bay, Jamaica. It had belonged to the same prominent old British Colonial family for almost 200 years. As most serious Dealers and Collectors know the majority of 18th and Early 19th Century West Indian Colonial Furniture is handed down as family heirlooms from generation to generation by the old British and French Colonial families on their Plantations in the Caribbean and seldom comes on the Market. This is a rare opportunity to purchase a fine example at a very reasonable cost.

Length: 72 inches
Width: 28 inches
Height: 42 inches

Price: $7,500.00

Early 19th C. British Colonial Pedestal Table from Jamaica, West Indies, c 1835

A Fine and Rare Early 19th Century British Colonial Pedestal Side Table from the Island of Jamaica in the West Indies. It dates from the William IV Period and was made of solid Mahogany that was Hand-Carved by Slaves on the Plantation, c. 1835. The Pedestal, with Balusters and Acanthus Leaf carving resting on a Quadripartite base with Bun feet, has been adapted in the West India Creole style and is typical of Jamaican Colonial furniture of the period. This exquisite piece of furniture has been attributed to the most famous Cabinetmaker in 19th Century Jamaica, Ralph Turnbull. This item is one of several splendid pieces of Early 19th Century Jamaican Colonial Furniture being sold and is from the famous Ashmeade-Hawkins Collection. This Pedestal Side Table originally came from the 18th Century Great House of Low Ground Plantation, Clarendon, Jamaica and belonged to James Beckford Wildman, Esq. (1789-1867), a wealthy Sugar Planter who also owned Chilham Castle in Kent, England and was Member of Parliament for Colchester from 1818 to 1826. A close friend of Jane Austen, he was also the Godson of the famous William Beckford of Fonthill who was known as “England’s wealthiest son”. This Pedestal Side Table remained in the possession of James Beckford Wildman’s descendants the Munn family of Low Ground Plantation till the 1990s. As most serious Dealers and Collectors know the majority of 18th and Early 19th Century West Indian Colonial Furniture is handed down as family heirlooms from generation to generation by the old British and French Colonial families on their Plantations in the Caribbean and seldom comes on the Market. This is a rare opportunity to purchase a fine example at a very reasonable cost.

Length: 42 inches
Width:  23 inches
Height: 37 inches

*SOLD

Price: $4,500.00

Early 19th C. British Colonial Card Table from Jamaica, West Indies, c 1810

A Fine and Very Rare Early 19th Century British Colonial George III Card Table from the Island of Jamaica in the West Indies. It dates from the Regency Period and was made of solid Mahogany that was Hand-Carved by Slaves on the Plantation, c.1810. The turned Pedestal, with Baluster and multiple Ring carving, rests on four elegant Sabre legs which are boldly carved and reeded and terminate in Brass Claws. It is very unusual to see Brass Claws on Jamaican Colonial Regency furniture and this level of sophistication suggests that it was probably copied from an English Pattern Book by a major Kingston Cabinet-Maker, possibly someone with connections to the famous English Firm of  Gillows of Lancaster and London. This item is one of several splendid pieces of Early 19th Century Jamaican Colonial Furniture being sold and is from the famous Ashmeade-Hawkins Collection. This Early 19th Century Regency Card Table originally came from the 18th Century Great House of Albion Estate, St. Ann, and belonged to the wealthy Moulton-Barrett family who owned vast Sugar Plantations in Jamaica and who were ancestors of the famous English Victorian Poetess Elizabeth Barrett Browning. As most serious Dealers and Collectors know the majority of 18th and Early 19th Century West Indian Colonial Furniture is handed down as family heirlooms from generation to generation by the old British and French Colonial families on their Plantations in the Caribbean and seldom comes on the Market. This is a rare opportunity to purchase a fine example at a very reasonable cost.

Length: 36 inches
Width:  18 inches
Height: 29 inches

*SOLD

Price: $2,500.00

Early 19th C. British Colonial Dressing Table from Jamaica, West Indies, c.1835

A Fine and Rare Early 19th Century British Colonial Dressing Table from the Island of Jamaica in the West Indies. It dates from the William IV Period and was made from solid Mahogany and Lignum Vitae that was Hand-Carved by Slaves on the Plantation, c. 1835. The Pedestal, with Balusters and Acanthus Leaf carving resting on a Triangular base with Bun feet, has been adapted in the West India Creole style and is typical of Jamaican Colonial furniture of the period. The hand-carved Fanlight decoration on the front is particularly well done and undoubtedly the work of a master Kingston Cabinet-Maker. This exquisite piece of furniture has been attributed to the most famous Cabinetmaker in 19th Century Jamaica, Ralph Turnbull. This item is one of several splendid pieces of Early 19th Century Jamaican Colonial Furniture being sold and is from the famous Ashmeade-Hawkins Collection. This magnificent Early 19th Century Jamaican Colonial Dressing Table came out of the 18th Century Great House of Morgan’s Valley Estate in Clarendon, once the plantation of the infamous Buccaneer Sir Henry Morgan who later became Lieutenant-Governor of Jamaica in 1671. It was owned for several generations by the Thomas Abrahams family who owned Morgan’s Valley Estate and other Plantations in Clarendon. It is said to have been originally made for James Wright Turner, Esq. (1799-1840) of Teak Penn, Clarendon, a wealthy Sugar Planter and Planting-Attorney who was a Member of the House of Assembly of Jamaica. His descendants sold it to the Abrahams family in the 1870s and it remained in their possession until the 1990s. As most serious Dealers and Collectors know the majority of 18th and Early 19th Century West Indian Colonial Furniture is handed down as family heirlooms from generation to generation by the old British and French Colonial families on their Plantations in the Caribbean and seldom comes on the Market. This is a unique opportunity to purchase a rare and outstanding example of Early 19th Century Jamaican Colonial Furniture at a very reasonable cost.

Length: 44 inches
Width:  21 inches
Height: 37 inches

Price: $5,000.00

18th Century British Colonial Planters Chair for Lady from Jamaica, West Indies

 

An extremely rare 18th Century British Colonial Planters Chair designed for a Lady from the Island of Jamaica in the West Indies. This style of Chair was first made in the City of Campeche in the Yucatan Province of Mexico in the 16th Century during the Spanish Colonial era and they were originally known as Campeche Chairs. They became very popular with the Spanish Creole Aristocracy in Mexico and were often found amongst the Mexican Colonial antique furniture on the old Haciendas, where they were also known as Butaca Chairs. In the 18th Century Spanish Colonists introduced the Campeche Chair, also known as the Butaca Chair, to Louisiana where they became extremely popular amongst the French Creole Aristocracy who called them Boutac Chairs and introduced them into their Plantation Houses on the Bayous and along the Mississippi River. The Leather-Seated Chairs, made from Ox-Hide or Mule-Hide stretched on a Mahogany wood frame, were found ideal for lounging in a Tropical Climate and unlike upholstered furniture they were free from insects. These Campeche Chairs in Louisiana were discovered by the Americans during the Late 18th Century and President Thomas Jefferson even ordered a pair for his Plantation at Monticello in Virginia. This style of Spanish Chair was also introduced to Jamaica from Mexico during the 18th Century, probably via Cuba, and until very recently they were known in Jamaica as Spanish Chairs. It was only during the 1970s that people first began calling them Planters Chairs, because they had always been popular with British Planters on the Plantations in Jamaica. Once only found in the old Plantation Great Houses in Jamaica, today they are extremely rare and very sought after by both Dealers and Collectors. This particular Planters Chair is very unique in that it is smaller than usual and was probably made for a Lady. One can imagine a British Planter’s wife lounging in it, fanning herself and drinking Coffee attended by her household Slaves. This Planter’s Chair has an excellent Provenance and once belonged to the wealthy Moulton-Barrett family who owned vast Sugar Plantations in Jamaica and were ancestors of the famous Victorian Poetess Elizabeth Barrett Browning. This is a unique opportunity to purchase a unusual example of a very rare and valuable 18th Century West Indian Planter’s Chairs made for a Lady.

Length: 31 inches
Width: 28 inches
Height: 42 inches

Price: $3,500.00

A Handsome Early 19th Century English William IV Parquetry Box. c. 1830

A handsome Early 19th Century English William IV Parquetry Box dating to around 1830. This splendid Box is made from Rosewood, cross-banded with Satinwood. The top has the most glorious parquetry inlay created from Mahogany, Rosewood and Satinwood surrounding a central eye inlaid with Mother of Pearl.The interior has been re-lined with a hand-marbled paper to create a clean and ready-to-use finish. The box remains in superb condition and comes complete with a working key and Scarlet silk tassel.

10 1/4″ x 8 1/4″ x 3 3/4″ tall.

Price: $1,500.00

Superb Early American Federal Style Mirror c. 1840 Inlaid Mahogany Gilt Eglomise

A superb Early 19th C. American Federal-style mirror, c. 1820 – 1840.  This is a genuine period piece, made of solid mahogany, with inlay and a reverse-painted eglomise panel above the mirror. The mirror is further adorned by a carved gilt wood finial and sides.  Essentially, it has all the “bells & whistles” of a high-end mirror from this period.  The mirror is 50″ tall and 24″ wide.

The mirror is in superb condition, as nice as you are likely to see.  The piece is completely intact and original.  It is free of cracks or chips in the wood, and the eglomise panel is intact, and free of loose or missing paint.  The gilt is bright, and the wood may have been re-gilded some time in the past.  It is done with gold leaf, rather than paint.  The mirror is old, and may be original.  There is some minor loss to the glazing, but much less so that what you would typically see in a mirror from this period.

Price: $3,000.00

EARLY 19TH CENTURY ENGLISH SCHOOL OIL PAINTING OF A SAILING SHIP OFF WHITBY HARBOUR, c. 1840

A highly decorative Early 19th century English Provincial School oil on canvas of a Sailing Ship off the coast of Whitby, North Yorkshire. In the distance the harbour walls with lighthouse, the town and abbey ruins beyond. The painting is in good condition having been recently cleaned and relined. It is contained within an elaborate gesso frame c.1880 with some traces of original gilding.

Dimensions:-  37.5″ x 29″ including frame.

Price: $5,000.00

Huge Early 18th Century English Oil Portrait of an English Gentleman attributed to THOMAS HUDSON, c.1730

A massive Early 18th Century English School Portrait of a velvet-robed English Gentleman, c. 1730.This finely painted oil on canvas is unsigned, a common practice in the day, however it does bear a small, aged paper label on the reverse, as pictured.  The label reads:  “Thomas Hudson, b 1701-d 1779, Master of (Painter?) Joshua Reynolds.” Thomas Hudson was a renowned English Portrait Painter in the mid-1700’s, and indeed, Sir Joshua Reynolds, himself a distinguished English Portrait Painter, was actually one of Hudson’s proteges.  When we acquired this painting, it was sold as “attributed to” Thomas Hudson.  While I have no reason to doubt that Hudson was the artist, nor can I be certain that he was.  Therefore,  I believe it is safest for to categorize the item simply as an early 18th Century English Old Master Painting.  


All that being said, this painting is both impressive and massive.  The canvas measures 40″ by 50,” while the outer dimensions of the gilded wooden frame are 47″ by 56″ by 2 1/2″ thick — in other words — it is 3′ 11″ wide by 4′ 8” tall and it probably weighs more than 60 lbs!  The canvas of this painting is in good condition, considering the fact that it is nearly 300 years old.  I am not sure if the frame is original, but it is certainly old and sturdy.  As you can see from the detailed photos, there is minor loss of the leaf scroll work on the frame is a number of spots, which can either be repaired or gilded over.  The bottom line is, there aren’t that many of these 18th Century Portraits on this grand scale available, so don’t miss this opportunity to purchase this one!

Price: $10,000.00

A Large Early 19th Century English Fox-Hunting Print titled “The Melton Breakfast” published in 1839.

“The Melton Breakfast”. Large Hand Coloured Early 19th Century Fox-Hunting Print. Engraved by Charles G. Lewis after an original Oil Painting by Sir Francis Grant. Published : London, England 1839 by Hodgson & Graves   HER MAJESTY’S  printsellers  6 Pall Mall.
 Well framed under glass long time ago. Ready to go on the wall.Upload Image

Size:  Image –   21 inches x 30 inches.

Framed:- 24 inches x 37 inches


 

Price: $1,500.00

Early 19th Century Hand-Painted Proof Engraving of the famous English Racehorse “Lancelot”, 1840.

Original Antique Hand-Painted Engraving Proof Print by L. F. Herring and C. Hunt, “Lancelot: Winner of the Great St. Leger Stakes at Doncaster 1840”

Stamped with seal.  Approximate dimensions: PENDING UPDATE.  c. 1840. Made in England.

Print text: “Painted by L. F. Herring.  Engraved by C. Hunt.  Lancelot: Winner of the Great St. Ledger Stakes at Doncaster 1840.  112 Subscribers ___ 11 Started.  Lancelot is own Brother to Touchstone, who won the Gt. St. Ledger Stakes in 1834, & the Gold Cup at Doncaster in 1835 6, was Bred by the Marquis of Westminster, Got by Camel out of Banter (bred by his Lordship in 1826) by Master Henry out of Boadicea, Sister to Bucephalus.  The property of the most noble the Marquis of Westminster.  To whom this Print by Permission is most respectfully dedicated by the publishers S & J Fuller.  London, Published Novr 1st by S & J Fuller at their Sporting Gallery 34 Rathboue Place.  Proof.”

Fair antique condition.  There is some tearing along the edges; the three largest are 1 7/8″, 1″, and 3/4″ in length.  The largest tear does encroach on the picture.


Price: $2,000.00

Early 19th Century English Mahogany Grandfather Clock made by Holford Richardson, Cheshire, England c. 1830

A Superb Early 19th Century English Mahogany Grandfather Clock in perfect working order.

The Bell Chime is strong and vibrant.

The Face Dial inscribed with the Clockmaker’s name of H. Richardson, Tarporlley. This would be Holford Richardson, a well-known Clockmaker in Tarporley, Cheshire, England between 1828 and 1837. 

The Face Dial has wonderful original hand painted pictorial moon settings.

This Early 19th Century English Grandfather Clock, which stands 8 Feet 4 Inches tall,  has a beautiful Mahogany case with a lovely age appropriate patina and is offered at a most attractive price.

Condition:

  • Very good, age appropriate, repaired door.

Dimensions:

  • 100″ H x 23″W x 10”D

Price: $9,500.00

A Set of 12 Antique English Mahogany Chippendale Dining Chairs made by S & H Jewell, London, England c. 1880

Description:

A fantastic set of 12 matching 19th Century English Mahogany Chippendale Dining Chairs dating from about 1880. The set contains 10 Side chairs and two Armchairs. They were made by S & H Jewell, exclusive Cabinetmakers of 131-2 High Holborn Street, London, England, which was founded in 1830. They are all solid mahogany and very heavy, well built and sturdy.   With original finish and great color.  They are 39″ high at the back by 21 1/2″ wide at the front by 19″ deep. Floor to seat height is 18″. They are in excellent condition, no damage or repairs but there is some sun bleaching on two to the chairs.  One of them is the Armchair pictured with one of the Side Chairs for comparison. The slip seats have been newly upholstered and are in excellent condition.  Guaranteed to be as described.

Price: $15,000.00

An elegant 18th Century George III English Sterling Silver Coffeepot made by Francis Crump, London 1772.

This gorgeous sterling pot has a domed hinged cover on inverted pear-form body issuing an ornate swan necked spout and decoratively mounted carved wood handle.  It is lovely and vibrant overall in excellent condition.  No noticeable repairs or removals and exhibits complete hallmarks! The Top is fully operational and has fine fit upon close. Handle is secure. There are very few , minute pin dots, stacking/storage marks on only one side~ so small I am unable to pick them up by camera (side opposite of hallmarks). Impressively maintained for a a 240 year old object! Superb  & important historical object with original finish and minimal signs of use, not altered or refinished and only showing stacking or handling marks.  Brilliant shine and gorgeous form. 


Hallmark Details~ Clearly marked below hinged top on exterior of tea pot – see photos. Lion passant (guardant)  – English mark for Sterling. The next hallmark, the crowned leopard ~ for London assayed silver. The third engraving mark, the Initials, F.C. for Francis Crump, a lesser known/rare maker. This piece by Francis Crump is  an excellent George III form and a valuable addition to any early English Silver, especially Georgian collection! Finally the date initial, “R” ~ 1772. 

Size ~ H 11 1/2″ 26.5 oz Troy All in…   Object as pictured.

Price: $6,500.00

A STYLISH GEORGE III REGENCY ENGLISH STERLING SILVER TEA SET MADE BY SOLOMON HOUGHAM, LONDON 1816

A simply gorgeous Early 19th Century Georgian Regency Silver Tea Service made by Solomon Hougham in London, 1816.

Each piece is delightfully engraved with floral decoration (including the spout of the teapot) and the rims have a gadroon mount in typical Regency fashion. There are many signs of quality within the service, not least the superb secret hinge set amongst the engraving on the teapot and the lovely original gilding in the cream jug and sugar bowl.

The tea pot pours beautifully and the complete tea set would be a joy in use on a daily basis as well as making a beautiful setting.

The condition is excellent throughout with crisp engraving and clear matching hallmarks. There are no dings, damage or repair.

MEASUREMENTS: Teapot length: (10.6″) height (6.25″) capacity 1600mm (2.75 UK pints) combined weight of the three pieces (32 ounces)

MARKS: Full set of English hallmarks (guaranteeing Sterling 925 standard solid silver) for London 1816, made by SOLOMON HOUGHAM (SH).

CONDITION: Excellent

Price: $5,000.00

A Neoclassical 18th Century Antique English Old Sheffield Plate Silver Tea Urn with Rams Head Ornaments, c. 1790.

A very elegant Old Sheffield Plate Silver Tea Urn

Late 18th Century English, c. 1790.

Traditional Neoclassical form design.

4 nice ball feet and 2 nice decorative rams head handles (See Pictures)

Note that there has been a repair around the top rim and there are other minor marks or dents, but they are hardly noticeable. However this piece is very clean and could probably even be used if you wish but would be great for display.

Height: 18 inches

Base: 6 1/4 inches square

Price: $1,250.00

A Fine Rare 18th Century Chinese Export Armorial Platter bearing the Coat-of-Arms of the Fitter Family

This superb 18th Century Chinese Export Porcelain Platter is decorated with a beautiful enamel painted Armorial depicting the Coat-of-Arms of Fitter family of Norfolk, England who were members of the English Landed Gentry. It has a gilt pattern around the interior and along the rim. It dates circa 1760 and measures approximately 11 + ¾ inches long by 8 + ½ inches wide. It is in excellent condition with just some light age appropriate wear and a small chip on one of the corners

Price: $4,500.00

An Early 19th Century English Derby King’s Pattern Imari Dinner Plate, Bloor Period, c.1815.

A beautiful Early 19th Century hand painted Derby King’s Pattern Dinner Plate in the Japan or Imari colours of Rust Red, Cobalt Blue and Gold, c. 1815. Hallmarked with hand painted Bloor Derby factory mark in Red on base.

Early 19th century,1815.
10 inches in diameter.

Excellent condition.

This is part of a large Dinner Service of Late 18th Century and Early 19th Century English Derby King’s Pattern Imari China that is for sale. Ask about other pieces that are available.




Price: $250.00

An Early 19th Century English Regency Spode China Platter in the Spode Peacock Pattern, No. 2118, c. 1815.

An Early 19th Century English Regency Spode China Platter hand painted in enamels in the famous Spode Peacock Pattern, No.2118, c. 1815. This was a copy of an earlier 18th Century Chinese Export Porcelain Pattern that was originally commissioned by the King of Portugal.

Size: 19 inches x 15 inches

Condition: Excellent

Price: $1,250.00

An Elegant Early 19th Century Wedgwood Pale Powder Blue Jasperware Neoclassical Campana Urn. c. 1820

An Elegant Early 19th Century Wedgwood Pale Powder Blue Jasperware Neoclassical Campana Urn. c. 1820. Stamped Wedgwood only.

Height: 10.5  inches

Width: 6 inches

Condition: Excellent

Price: $1,500.00

A beautiful Pair of Mid 19th Century “Worcester” Porcelain Vases with Exotic Birds and Scale Blue Decoration, c. 1860

A beautiful Pair of Mid 19th Century Porcelain Vases in the 18th Century Worcester “Scale Blue and Exotic Birds” pattern. These Vases are hand-painted in Rococo style panels embellished with rich gilding. Made in the 19th Century by Samson of Paris, it is signed on the underside with an under-glaze blue pseudo-Chinese seal fretted mark in the manner of the early Worcester Dr. Wall period pattern of the same name. Samson’’s pieces have become collectors’ items in their own right and are now commanding record prices.

Height: 12 inches

Width: 9 inches

Condition: Excellent

Price: $1,500.00

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